Go up the lighthouse at the southern-most tip of Africa

On-a-budget Thrill

Built in 1848, the Cape Agulhas lighthouse was the second to be built in South Africa after the Green Point lighthouse in Cape Town, in 1824. Today the lighthouse is a national monument, housing the unique lighthouse museum and a small rustic restaurant.

The coastline here is a graveyard of shipwrecks with the sea off Cape Agulhas being notoriously treacherous. The Arniston (1815), Cooranga (1964), Elise (1879), European (1877), Federal Lakes (1975), Geortyrder (1849), Gouritz (1981), and Gwendola (1968) are just a few of the vessels that were lost along this coast. (You can see showpieces from some of these shipwrecks are on display at the Bredasdorp Shipwreck Museum, on Independent Street in Bredasdorp – 028 424 1240.)

The loss of ships, notably The Arniston, necessitated the building of the lighthouse. Seventy-one steps lead up to the top of what is now the second-oldest working lighthouse in southern Africa, for a spectacular view that is a must-see according to visitors. Stone mined from an adjacent limestone quarry provided the raw materials for its construction.

Built in 1848, the Cape Agulhas lighthouse was the second to be built in South Africa after the Green Point lighthouse in Cape Town, in 1824. Today the lighthouse is a national monument, housing the unique lighthouse museum and a small rustic restaurant.

Visitors to the area can still see the Meisho Maru 38 wreck on the shores of Cape Agulhas. Remains of ancient stone fish traps used by the Khoisan people can be seen to the east of the lighthouse.

Go up the lighthouse at the southern-most tip of Africa: R15 for adults and R7.50 for kids (2-11 years)

Cape Agulhas is about 2 hour, 45 minutes' drive from Cape Town, call 028 435 6075.